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Pattaya, Thailand

Written on: Thursday March 29th, 2012

A journal entry from: S.E. Asia 2012

One of the highlights of our stay in Chiang Mai was the Sunday night market. Vendors set themselves up along the streets and sell clothes, handicrafts and food. The goods are sometimes authentic and handmade sometimes not but the scale and the size of the market are amazing. There are food stalls everywhere and deciding what to eat can present a huge problem as it all looks so good.On Monday morning, with regret, we boarded the plane to Bangkok. From the airport we took a bus about one and a half hours to a place called Pattaya.  Pattaya was one of the first international Thai resort towns and has a reputation for beautiful beaches, girly bars and large scale concrete vacation high rises. Our resort was located to the far south and had neither the bars nor the beaches. For some reason, however we ended up in a luxury villa with it's own private swimming pool and a restaurant that provides room service free of charge. Just what we needed to recharge our batteries after a grueling three months of traveling. With night time lows of 28c  we are wondering how we are going to cope in Vancouver which will have a high of 7c the day we arrive. We are off to the airport tomorrow for a grueling flight home via Beijing. Stay tuned for the forthcoming Europe trip blog coming in about 4 weeks.

 

From Bhoxz on Dec 21st, 2015

Does everyone keep fotgitreng that politicians who invent and fund such programs are doing so because the public wants them? Why the public wants them is an interesting sociological question, but we still fortunately live in a democracy where the people get what they want. Unfortunately, because the people don't want to pay for their wishes, we get ourselves into a financial hole. In both cases the politicians we elect have trouble leading public opinion to a good place instead of just following it. Most bloggers have the attitude that what they want is their birthright and that the rest of the public has a duty to finance it. Hooray for democracy!